Scientific Program Committee

Deborah Atherly, PATH

Julie Bines, University of Melbourne

Adam Cohen, World Health Organization

Bruce Gellin, Sabin Vaccine Institute

Roger Glass, Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, US

Gagandeep Kang, Translational Health Science and Technology Institute of the Department of Biotechnology, Government of India

Carl Kirkwood, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Kathleen Neuzil, University of Maryland School of Medicine

Umesh Parashar, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US

Mathuram Santosham, Johns Hopkins University

Duncan Steele, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Deborah Atherly, PATH

Deborah Atherly, PhD

Director, Health Economics and Outcomes Research

Dr. Atherly is responsible for conducting economic and financial evaluations on drugs, vaccines and diagnostics targeted for use in developing countries. In this role, she has developed global demand and supply forecasts for vaccines, including rotavirus and human papilloma virus (HPV) and has evaluated the health and economic impact of vaccines on developing country populations.

She has conducted market assessments, including in-depth analyses of the actual or expected costs of manufacturing (COGS) and expected revenues for vaccines in development, including rotavirus, pneumococcal, HPV, MenA, ETEC and Shigella.  Dr. Atherly has worked in many sub-Saharan African countries to collect and evaluate economic data in order to strengthen evidence for decisions on vaccine introduction. She also assists ministries of health with the interpretation and communication of these data. She has worked extensively in partnership and advisory roles with many global health agencies including Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance; UNICEF; WHO; PAHO and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Prior to joining PATH, Dr. Atherly worked in both the private and public sectors. While at Parke-Davis, Johnson & Johnson, and as a consultant to other pharmaceutical companies, she developed and conducted economic and financial analyses, including cost-effectiveness, return on investment and demand forecasting. Based on these analyses, she implemented strategic plans for communication of these data to policymakers. She was a pharmacy director, and has held various clinical leadership positions in hospitals and health systems. Dr. Atherly is a pharmacist and received her PhD in Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research from the University of Washington.

Julie Bines, University of Melbourne

Professor Bines is the inaugural Victor and Loti Smorgon Professor of Paediatrics and Deputy Head of Department of Paediatrics at the University of Melbourne.  Professor Bines is a Paediatric Gastroenterologist and Head of Clinical Nutrition at the Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne. She leads the RV3 Rotavirus Vaccine Program at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, a program that aims to develop a low cost neonatal rotavirus vaccine to prevent rotavirus disease from birth. She also leads the Enteric Virus Group at MCRI, providing oversight for the WHO Rotavirus Regional Reference Laboratory and the Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program. Professor Bines has played a significant role in understanding the association between rotavirus vaccines and intussusception.  She is also recognised internationally for her leadership in clinical and research efforts aimed at improving the outcome for children with intestinal failure.

Adam Cohen, World Health Organization

Adam L. Cohen, MD MPH, is a pediatrician and epidemiologist. He received his medical degree from West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia, completed his Residency in Pediatrics and Fellowship in General Academic Pediatrics at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington, and served in the Epidemic Intelligence Service at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia. At CDC he has worked in the areas of prevention of bacterial pneumonia and influenza in international settings, vaccines, antimicrobial resistance, and patient safety. He is board certified in paediatrics and holds academic appointments at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia and University of Pretoria in Pretoria, South Africa. He is a Captain within the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service and has assisted U.S. government public health responses to Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans in 2005, pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in 2009, and Ebola in West Africa in 2014. He has served on national and international committees with the World Health Organization and the United Nations. He has authored more than 100 journal articles and book chapters. He has worked in more than 40 countries and currently lives in Geneva, Switzerland, where we works at the World Health Organization coordinating global surveillance for vaccine-preventable diseases such as rotavirus and pneumococcus.

Bruce Gellin, Sabin Vaccine Institute

Bruce Gellin, M.D., M.P.H.

President, Global Immunization

Dr. Bruce Gellin joined the Sabin Vaccine Institute as the inaugural president of Global Immunization in March 2017. Prior to joining Sabin, Dr. Gellin served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health and Director of the National Vaccine Program Office at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), where he was the principle technical, strategic and policy advisor to the Assistant Secretary for Health on all aspects of the National Vaccine Program.

In this role, Dr. Gellin served as a technical and policy advisor to the World Health Organization, focusing on influenza vaccines and global issues of vaccine hesitancy. In addition, he represented the U.S. government on the research and development focus of the Decade of Vaccines Collaboration and led the pandemic influenza preparedness and response activities of the Global Health Security Initiative.

At HHS, Dr. Gellin was responsible for developing the National Vaccine Plan, our country's blueprint for all aspects of vaccines and immunization. He also coordinated government-wide efforts on seasonal influenza and the corresponding opportunity to strengthen the adult immunization system in the United States. In 2005, he led the creation of HHS’s first pandemic influenza preparedness and response plan. Later, during the 2009 influenza pandemic, he led the U.S. team that donated H1N1 vaccine to other countries, expanded the nation’s vaccine safety monitoring system, and coordinated interagency efforts on vaccine development, supply and distribution.

Prior to joining HHS, Dr. Gellin founded and served as executive director of the National Network for Immunization Information, worked as a medical officer at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, served as Epidemic Intelligence Service officer at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and was a Luce Scholar in the Philippines. Dr. Gellin’s global health work includes consulting for Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, chairing the World Health Organization’s Global Action Plan for Influenza Vaccines Advisory Group, working with the Children’s Vaccine Initiative, and serving as a Warren Weaver fellow at the Rockefeller Foundation. He is one of the nation’s principle spokespersons on vaccines and immunizations and has served as on the faculty at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and Vanderbilt University Medical School. He recently was appointed to Georgetown University Medical Center’s Department of Medicine as an adjunct professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases.

In 1991, Dr. Gellin earned an M.P.H. in epidemiology from the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. He is a graduate of Weill Cornell Medical College and was a Morehead Scholar at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at Vanderbilt University and later was a preventive medicine resident at Cornell and at the CDC’s Arctic Investigations Program in Anchorage, Alaska. Dr. Gellin achieved board certification in internal medicine and infectious diseases, is an active member of numerous professional organizations, and serves as a peer reviewer for over a dozen medical journals. 

In 2016, the Infectious Diseases Society of America awarded Dr. Gellin with the Society Citation in recognition of his work in the field of infectious diseases, and in 2015, he was bestowed the honor of the American Medical Association’s Nathan Davis Award for Outstanding Government Service for his leadership and vision while overseeing our nation’s vaccine and immunization initiatives. 

Roger Glass, Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, US

Roger I. Glass, M.D., Ph.D.

Director, Fogarty International Center
Associate Director for International Research, NIH


Dr. Glass was named Director of the Fogarty International Center and Associate Director for International Research by NIH Director Elias A. Zerhouni, M.D., on March 31, 2006.

Dr. Glass graduated from Harvard College in 1967, received a Fulbright Fellowship to study at the University of Buenos Aires in 1967, and received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and his M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1972. He joined the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 1977 as a medical officer assigned to the Environmental Hazards Branch. He was a Scientist at the International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research in Bangladesh from 1979-1983 and returned to Sweden where he received his doctorate from the University of Goteborg. In 1984, he joined the National Institutes of Health Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, where he worked on the molecular biology of rotavirus. In 1986, Dr. Glass returned to the CDC to become Chief of the Viral Gastroenteritis Unit at the National Center for Infectious Diseases.

Dr. Glass's research interests are in the prevention of gastroenteritis from rotaviruses and noroviruses through the application of novel scientific research. He has maintained field studies in India, Bangladesh, Brazil, Mexico, Israel, Russia, Vietnam, China and elsewhere. His research has been targeted toward epidemiologic studies to anticipate the introduction of rotavirus vaccines. He is fluent and often lectures in five languages.

Dr. Glass has received numerous awards including the prestigious Charles C. Shepard Lifetime Scientific Achievement Award presented by the CDC in recognition of his 30-year career of scientific research application and leadership, and the Dr. Charles Merieux Award from the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases for his work on rotavirus vaccines in the developing world. Dr. Glass received the 2015 Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal Award for his many contributions to improving children’s health worldwide, including novel scientific research for the prevention of gastroenteritis from rotaviruses and noroviruses.  Dr. Glass was also the recipient of the 2016 Cura Personalis Award from Georgetown University.  This award honors individuals whose outstanding contributions to human health are guided by compassion and service. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the U.S. National Academy of Medicine.  Dr. Glass has co-authored more than 600 research papers and chapters.

He is married to Barbara Stoll, M.D., the H. Wayne Hightower Distinguished Professor in the Medical Sciences and Dean of the University of the Texas Medical School at Houston, and the father of three children: Nina, Michael and Andy Glass. 

Gagandeep Kang, Translational Health Science and Technology Institute of the Department of Biotechnology, Government of India

Gagandeep Kang is Executive Director of the Translational Health Science and Technology Institute of the Department of Biotechnology, Government of India. She holds MBBS, MD and PhD degrees from the Christian Medical College, Vellore and multiple Fellowships.

Dr. Kang’s research on paediatric diarrhoea focuses on rotavirus epidemiology, prevention and vaccine development. She leads programmes on rotavirus vaccine impact assessment and heads the WHO Rotavirus Reference Laboratory for SEARO.

Carl Kirkwood, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Senior Program officer, leads rotavirus initiative in the Enteric and Diarrheal Diseases program, Global Health Division of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Prior to joining the Foundation, Carl was group leader of the Enteric Virus Group, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, which is based at The Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Australia. He is an Associate Professor at La Trobe University, Department of Microbiology, and an honorary Fellow at Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

His research program investigated infectious diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, specifically diarrhoeal disease caused by rotavirus and norovirus; and microbial and genetic involvement in the development of Crohn’s disease in children. He was director of the Australian Rotavirus Surveillance Program which studies patterns of rotavirus genotypes causing disease in Australian children. This research was focused to understand the mechanism underlying vaccine escape and viral evolution, and provides critical information to maintain a successful ongoing vaccine program. He was director of the WHO Collaborating Centre for Child Health (rotavirus), and director of the WHO Western Pacific Regional rotavirus reference laboratory, playing a lead role in planning, training and implementation of surveillance studies to understand rotavirus disease. He is co-developer of a human neonatal rotavirus vaccine, currently undergoing evaluation in clinical trials to evaluate immunogenicity and efficacy.

He has authored more than 150 publications and 5 book chapters on rotavirus research and other infectious disease related topics. He has also made a significant contribution to the discipline through supervision of higher degree students, undergraduate teaching and a range of activities such as membership on editorial boards, grant review panels and positions in various scientific societies.

Kathleen Neuzil, University of Maryland School of Medicine

Kathleen M. Neuzil, MD, MPH, FIDSA

Director, Center for Vaccine Development

Dr. Neuzil is one of the world’s most influential research scientists and advocates in the area of vaccine development and policy. She is deputy director of the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s groundbreaking new Institute for Global Health, as well as director of the Center for Vaccine Development (CVD). Throughout her career, she has conducted clinical and epidemiologic studies on vaccine-preventable diseases, including work on influenza and rotavirus, that have informed domestic and international vaccine policy.

From 2005-2015, Dr. Neuzil held leadership positions at PATH, an international nonprofit global health organization based in Seattle. At PATH, Dr. Neuzil led large multidisciplinary teams to design and implement pivotal vaccine trials and operational research, and to translate these findings into policy, access and delivery of vaccines in the world’s poorest countries. Dr. Neuzil's research capabilities are complimented by nearly 20 years of involvement in domestic and international policy, including membership on the Centers for Disease Control’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices as well as the Pandemic Influenza Task Force for the Infectious Disease Society of America.

Additionally, she has served as a technical advisor to the World Health Organization on diarrheal diseases, maternal immunization and vaccine safety. Dr. Neuzil has contributed more than 160 scientific publications on vaccines and infectious diseases.

Umesh Parashar, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US

Lead, Enteric Viruses Epidemiology Team, Division of Viral Diseases, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Dr. Parashar is the Lead of the Enteric Viruses Epidemiology Team in the Division of Viral Diseases at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Parashar completed medical school in India and then completed postgraduate training in Public Health and Preventive Medicine in the United States. He joined the CDC as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer in 1996 and has spent more than 15 years at CDC researching the epidemiology of viral gastroenteritis and methods for its prevention and control, including vaccination strategies against rotavirus gastroenteritis. He was the CDC co-lead of the working group that developed the recommendations for use of the new rotavirus vaccines in the United States. The CDC Enteric Viruses Team also leads the Disease Burden and Surveillance Activities of the Rotavirus Vaccine Program (RVP), a partnership between the CDC, World Health Organization, and Program for Applied Technology in Health that is supported by the Global Alliance for Vaccines for Immunization. The RVP conducted activities to accelerate introduction of rotavirus vaccines in developing countries with the greatest burden of rotavirus disease. Dr. Parashar has published more than 200 scientific papers and book chapters and has given numerous peer-reviewed and invited presentations and scientific conferences. He has also served as guest editor on 4 supplements for leading scientific journals and on advisory committees to the World Health Organization. He has received several awards, including the Oswald Avery Award for Early Achievement from the Infectious Disease Society of America, the Shepard Award for Best Scientific Paper in the Prevention and Control Category from the CDC in 2009, and six awards for Distinguished Service from the Secretary of the US Department of Health and Human Services.

Mathuram Santosham, Johns Hopkins University

Mathuram Santosham, MD

Professor, Pediatrics and International Health, Johns Hopkins University and Chair, Rota Council

Dr. Santosham was born in Vellore, India and obtained his medical degree from the Jawaharlal Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER) in, Pondicherry, India in 1970. He subsequently moved to the USA and obtained Board Certification in Pediatrics and an MPH degree from the Johns Hopkins University. He completed a Fellowship in Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Dr. Santosham is professor of Pediatrics and International Health at the Johns Hopkins University (JHU) Medical Institutions. He is also Founder and Director of the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian. He holds Professorships in the Department of International Health and the Department of Pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University.

Dr. Santosham is internationally known for his work on oral rehydration therapy and for his work on childhood vaccines. He has conducted numerous vaccine efficacy trials, including rotavirus vaccine, H. influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine, and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. He has been a global leader in the national and international dissemination of these vaccines worldwide. He was the principal investagator of the GAVI funded Hib Initiative. The latter project was instrumental in increasing the adoption of Hib vaccines in GAVI eligible countries from 20% in 2005 to over 85 % in 2009.

Dr. Santosham serves on numerous national and international committees to promote infant vaccines and oral rehydration therapy. He has acted as consultant for several international agencies including W.H.O., USAID and UNICEF. He has provided consultation in various aspects of child survival in over 30 countries. He is the author of over 200 peer reviewed journals and serves as a reviewer for several international medical journals. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the prestigious Thrasher Research Fund award for excellence in research (1988), Ambassador for Research America 2009 and the Bob Austrian Orator, for International Symposium on Pneumococcas and Pneumococcal Disease, Alice Springs, Australia, April 2006. He was also asked to deliver the Maurice Hillman Memorial Lecture at the CDC, Atlanta on March 17th 2008 during an immunization conference attended by over 1000 delegates. Recently, he was given the Indian Health Service Director’s Special Recognition Award for his outstanding contributions to the health of Native Americans and the global impact of his work on immunizations and oral rehydration therapy. 

Duncan Steele, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Deputy Director and Strategic Lead for Enteric Vaccines, Enteric and Diarrhoeal Diseases, Global Health, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Duncan Steele, PhD, is a microbiologist with extensive experience in virology and microbiology, especially for diarrhoeal diseases, and in clinical trials. Before starting at the foundation as a Senior Program Officer in October 2011, Duncan was the Senior Technical Advisor at PATH, where he worked across both Immunization Solutions with the Rotavirus Vaccine Program and in Vaccine Solutions with the Advancing Rotavirus Vaccines program and the Enteric Vaccines Initiative.

Previously, as a scientist at the Initiative for Vaccine Research, Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals, World Health Organization, Dr. Steele was responsible for the diarrheal disease vaccines portfolio. In this role, he developed and coordinated a global strategic agenda for vaccine research for the major diarrheal and enteric diseases including cholera, enterotoxigenic E coli, rotavirus, Shigella, and typhoid fever. In addition, he coordinated and facilitated vaccine clinical trials in Africa and Asia and established, coordinated, and facilitated regional surveillance networks in Africa, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe in collaboration with the WHO Regional Offices, ministries of health, PATH, and CDC.

Previously, Dr. Steele was the Director of the South African Medical Research Council Diarrhoeal Pathogens Research Unit at Medunsa, South Africa, where he developed a program of research activities with local and international collaboration and funding that expanded into other parts of Africa. He established a vaccine clinical trial site in the Madibeng District, South Africa with four clinics, serving a population of approximately half a million people. This resulted in several large international studies undertaking the clinical evaluation of rotavirus vaccines, live attenuated influenza vaccines and other vaccines.

Dr. Steele is the author of more than 250 scientific publications on vaccine research, development, evaluation, and other topics.